Purpose of this Blog

Rob Gutro is an author, paranormal investigator and medium with Inspired Ghost Tracking of Maryland. Since he was a child he could receive messages from ghosts or spirits (who have crossed over). *He wrote the books "Pets and the Afterlife," "Pets and the Afterlife 2," "Ghosts and Spirits" and "Lessons Learned from Talking to the Dead" to teach others how ghosts and Spirits communicate with the living and to give proof of the afterlife. As a scientist, he also provides some scientific explanations about how energy is the baseline for the afterlife and the medium that entities use to communicate.

Saturday, February 2, 2013

Ghostly Energy and Headaches: Lightning and Migraines

Does lightning cause your headache?

 I always get a headache in the back left side of my head whenever the energy of a ghost or spirit is around. Now, a new scientific study links lightning (another form of energy) to headaches, helping to reinforce my theory of "electrical overload" in the brain from outside energies (like ghosts and spirits).  As a meteorologist, I find this very plausible and exciting that this research acts to confirm my theory about getting "ghostly headaches."

 Does lightning cause your headache?

Lightning tied to onset of headaches, migraines, says study

A new study has found that lightning might affect the onset of headache and migraines.
ARTICLE: http://earthsky.org/human-world/lightning-tied-to-onset-of-headaches-migraines-says-study?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=90a68c0171-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email
Do you sometimes feel like you’re getting a headache when a thunderstorm is coming on? Turns out, it’s not the thunder – it’s the lightning. That’s according to a new study that has found that lightning might affect the onset of headache and migraines.

Photo via Shutterstock
The study, published in the January 24, 2013 online edition of the journal Cephalalgia, said there was a 31 percent increased risk of headache and 28 percent increased risk of migraine for chronic headache sufferers on days lighting struck within 25 miles of study participants’ homes.
In addition, new-onset headaches and migraines increased by 24 percent and 23 percent in participants when lightning was nearby.
Geoffrey Martin, fourth-year medical student at University of Connecticut, and his father, headache expert Vincent Martin MD, a professor at University of Connecticut, led the study. Geoffrey Martin said:
Many studies show conflicting findings on how weather, including elements like barometric pressure and humidity, affect the onset of headaches. However, this study very clearly shows a correlation between lightning, associated meteorological factors and headaches.

Arlington, Virginia, looking towards Washington DC. September 1, 2012. Photo credit: EarthSky Facebook friend Brian Allen. Thanks for posting Brian!
Vincent Martin said:
We used mathematical models to determine if the lightning itself was the cause of the increased frequency of headaches or whether it could be attributed to other weather factors encountered with thunderstorms. Our results found a 19 percent increased risk for headaches on lightning days, even after accounting for these weather factors. This suggests that lightning has its own unique effect on headache.
So why would lightning trigger a headache? Vincent Martin explained:
Electromagnetic waves emitted from lightning could trigger headaches. In addition, lightning produces increases in air pollutants like ozone and can cause release of fungal spores that might lead to migraine.
The researchers said that his study gives some insight into the tie between headaches or migraines, lightning and other meteorologic factors. However, the exact mechanisms through which lightning and/or its associated meteorologic factors trigger headache are unknown.
Bottom line: A new study, published in the January 24, 2013 online edition of the journal Cephalalgia, is the first tying lightning to headache. The study found there was a 31 percent increased risk of headache and 28 percent increased risk of migraine for chronic headache sufferers on days lighting struck within 25 miles of study participants’ homes.
Read more from the University of Cincinnati

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